News

28/09/18 Another beautiful autumn evening at the Depot

The Depot is on fire again - another beautiful autumn sunset

21/09/18 BTF Coach Ed Annual Conference

British Triathlon Coach Education conference/training day

27/09/18 Coaching News September

One of the biggest challenges of trying to use a low resolution narrative when presenting a natural running form workshop, is that when it comes to the detailed discussions, only a high resolution narrative will suffice.  The difficulty here, however, is that these sessions are nearly always time pressured in trying to condense what would ordinarily be several hours of theory into a short delivery window.  And so it was when I attempted to do just this at the recent Duathlon Hub training weekend.

 

Every time I teach this particular part of the theory, the content changes and thus no two sessions are ever the same.  Depending on the interests and prior knowledge of the participants or, more importantly, on the questions or feedback I receive, the delivery always meanders off the script in unique ways.  In this most recent case, the question I received was not only worthy of a diversion during the session, it prompted me to go back to my notes to ensure that I had got my story straight.

 

In the high resolution narrative, there are multiple contributory biological factors in our ancestors’ ability to survive the transition from inhabiting the tropical forest to the savannah.  In fact, there are probably somewhere between a half dozen to a dozen factors which are deemed critical to this success and thus, our survival as a species.  In the low resolution narrative, I have a tendency to use one key example – that of our ability to sweat - to simplify the delivery and make a key point. 

 

To support this example, as most people haven’t heard of a kudu (a kind of antelope inhabiting the savannah), I ask the audience to consider what happens when they take their pet dog or a horse out for a run on a hot day.  The explanation is that their inability to sweat as a method of heat regulation offered us an advantage over other mammals.  This provided our ancestors with a critical adaptation that enabled them to source food with the necessary high calorific content that ultimately fuelled (no pun intended) our rise from failed forest dweller to masters of all we survey.

 

However, as was rightly pointed out to me by workshop attendee Gill Fullen, horses certainly do sweat.  Indeed, of course, horses sweat, as do dogs, and so the sound bite is factually incorrect.  Gill’s comment therefore sent me scurrying back to my notes to work out why and how I had reduced the high resolution explanation to this simplified version. 

 

It is not just our ability to sweat that is a key evolutionary advantage.  It is our capacity to sweat more than other mammals that is significant here.  We share apocrine sweat glands with our mammalian cousins, which form their prime effective sweating apparatus, however humans also have an abundance of eccrine sweat glands (between 5 and 10 million) that cover our body, particularly in the palms of the hands, the soles of the feet and the head, that provide the prime cooling system for humans.

 

As a result, we are able to secrete more than a litre of liquid an hour which evaporates from the surface of the skin cooling the blood beneath, and the body as a result.  In contrast, not only does a horse lack the volume of sweat glands, it is also covered in a fur coat which, whilst reflecting solar radiation, stops the air from circulating and prevents the sweat from evaporating.  To supplement the cooling system, in extreme conditions, animals such as horses pant to increase evaporative cooling.  However, one of the additional evolutionary advantages that comes from bipedalism, is that we have an adaptive breathing system that allows us to breath independently of our walking or running cadence.  Equally critical for our survival, is that our endurance running pace forced our prey to increase its pace from a sustainable trot, to an energetic gallop.  At a gallop, quadrupeds such as antelope and wildebeest (and horses) are easily able to outrun us.  However, they are only able to take one breath per leg cycle and thus, whilst galloping, are unable to pant, the process of taking short, sharp, shallow breaths.

 

This limitation comes from the movement of the internal organs against the diaphragm in accordance with the rhythmic timing of the animal’s gait.  Thus, whilst galloping, the animal must synchronise the breath with each stride, an insufficient process to enable both breathing and cooling to effectively take place.  To complete the story, all our ancestors had to do was to track the chosen (probably the largest) animal in the midday heat, ensuring that it never had sufficient time to cool, thus forcing its body temperature to a critical level when the animal would collapse.

 

For those who wish to learn more, the primary source for this theory is:

Bramble, D. M., Jenkins Jr. F. A. (1993). Mammalian locomotor-respiratory integration: Implications for diaphragmatic and pulmonary design. Science, 262: 235-40.  

 

For the low resolution narrative, I would urge you all to read The Story of the Human Body: Evolution, health & disease by Daniel Lieberman.  It’s a thoroughly absorbing book.

 

Slightly closer to home, we have had an excellent month with athlete successes at the Powerman Zofingen ITU World Long Distance Duathlon Championships, taking Applied Triathlon Coaching’s overall medal tally to 30 medals in multisport competition!  Additionally, our regular marathon runner Deb Self successfully completed the slightly longer 112 mile challenge that is the Rat Race Coast to Coast.  The photos from this event are simply stunning!  Well done to all. 

 

We are now heavily engaged in planning for next year and would like to welcome those athletes who have recently joined our ranks.  This is always an exciting time for us as we get to know your objectives and ambitions and learn to work with you.  Please note however that we are heading to the Lake District for our annual week-long retreat this weekend and therefore will be preparing training plans to see you through this period.  Although we will have internet access, the connection can be slow so please do call if you need any assistance.

 

Happy training in these beautiful early autumn days.

 

Invoices are on the way.

 

JC

 

10/09/18 Athlete Testing day with Angela Wray

A full on day of athlete baseline testing, video analysis and planning with Team GB AG Sprint Triathlete Angela Wray in preparation for the 2019 World Championships.

09/09/18 Duathlon Hub (UK) Natural Running Form workshop

Natural Running Form Workshop with some of the world's best duathletes at the Duathlon Hub (UK) Peak District weekend.  Great fun with a fab group of athletes!

02/09/18 More success at Powerman Zofingen!

The perfect job for me - pointing and shouting...a great performance from all Team GB AG athletes at the 2018 Powerman Zofingen ITU World Long Distance Duathlon Champs - 4 team members have worked with @AppliedTri, winning two more medals to add to the tally. Chapeau!

01/09/18 Coaching News August

All of a sudden the greater part of the summer is behind us and, bar a few hardy souls now tapering for Coast to Coast, Powerman Zofingen, the Brutal, the Multisport Festival in Ibiza, or those final club races, this is now the time for what was historically termed the transition period.  I write historically, simply because the word has obviously taken on a whole new meaning with the advent of multisport.  However, this minor confusion aside, the transition period remains an important aspect of any annual periodisation plan.

 

The transition period is essentially a recovery period that allows the athlete to recharge the batteries.  This period can sometimes be a shortened break to allow a brief recovery phase in the midst of a double (or triple) periodised plan, between races, readying the athlete for the next preparatory phase of training.  Or, more traditionally, the transition period is a 4 to 6 week full, but active, recovery linked to the next annual periodised plan. 

 

I could try and write something from memory, or rather, from my own interpretation of transition in its practical coaching application.  However, it is far easier to directly quote Tudor Bompa, who is regarded as the father of all things periodisation: “After long periods of preparation, hard work, stressful competitions, in which both physiological and psychological fatigue can accumulate, a transition period should be used to link annual training plans or [the] preparation for another major competition, as in the case of [multiple] periodised plans.”

 

The training during the transition period should be low key with a reduction in all loading factors – intensity and volume, technical and tactical – with allowances for general training only.  The objective is to allow for the facilitation of psychological rest, relaxation and biological regeneration.  Failure to allow for a full recovery before embarking on a further periodised plan is likely to impair performance in future training cycles whilst also increasing the risk of injury.

 

However, this phase of training requires a similar level of consideration to every other week within a training cycle.  If nothing else, this is to ensure the avoidance of the most common mistake of the transition period – that of the athlete allowing the training to come to a complete standstill.  Any abrupt interruption of training will lead to a significant detraining effect resulting in a “substantial loss in the physiological adaptations established in the previous months of training”.

 

For endurance athletes, short term detraining can result in a substantial reduction in both time to exhaustion and overall endurance performance.  “Maximal aerobic capacity can be reduced by 4% in as little as four days of detraining, by 7% [within] three weeks and by 14% in as little as four weeks of inactivity.”  Similar reductions in output occur with physiological markers of power and strength also.  The initial phase of the next training will therefore be required to regain this lost ground before further progression of athlete performance can be sought.

 

Recovery from injury aside, active recovery is therefore preferable to ensure that athletes continue to engage the bioenergetic characteristics of the sport being trained for.  Training should be low key with volumes and levels of intensity set to be approximately 40 – 50% of those achieved during the peak periods of the competitive phase.  Additionally, with the ever increasing range of events that athletes need to prepare for and thus the need for athletes to be up to speed earlier and earlier every season, there is a serious call to start back onto full training without allowing for the full 4 – 6 week period.  Thus, the transition phase, particularly for those with early season qualification races, is often reduced by at least two weeks.  This allows for an early reintroduction in particular of form drills and skill redevelopment before embarking on the first phase of the next annual periodised plan.  The progression should be carefully considered, however, with a carefully crafted, gradual rebuild in volume and intensity.

 

This is also the ideal time for athletes and coaches to review the progress made in the previous 12 months and begin to plan for the next.  Additionally, the end of the transition period is the ideal time for the athlete to re assess current performance levels through physiological assessments to set the benchmarks for the forthcoming training.  We are currently busy scheduling for this important task with both our long term athletes as well as those who are coming on board in preparation for the 2019 season.

 

With the increased numbers of athletes passing through the Depot requiring assessment and testing, particularly bike lactate testing and running video analysis, we are delighted to announce that we have moved!  We are now to be found about 20 feet from our previous location, still in Building 86 at the Royal Ordnance Depot in Weedon but now in the main building on the left.  The additional space will hopefully allow more opportunity for coaching, with additional services to come on board in the next few weeks and months.  Please keep an eye on the website or Facebook for further details or email to make a booking.

 

I am heading off to the 2018 ITU Powerman Long Distance World Championships in the morning and then to the Duathlon Hub Peak District weekend to present both a Natural Running Form workshop and an introduction to Team GB Age-Group racing.  Busy times before we head to the Lake District at the end of September for our own transition period.

 

Keep up the hard work please, unless your own transition period has already started, in which case, please enjoy a little active down time before we begin the training full on once more!

 

02/07/18 Coaching News July

There is one month in each year that we await with bated breath and this year it was July.  Despite having the European Sprint Triathlon Championships in Glasgow still to come in August and the World Long Distance Duathlon Championships in Zofingen in September, plus a multitude of other competitions, July saw the culmination of a year of hard work for many Applied Tri athletes.

 

A big challenge for many in July was Ironman Bolton.  Whilst we have probably had the best weather for long distance training in recent memory (if you think long bike rides in the heat is bad, you should try them in the rain!), this brought unusual problems to the race venue.  The fires on Rivington Moor were very sad to witness and the race organiser did well to re-route the bike course at short notice.  Equally, the triathletes did well to take these last-minute course adjustments in their stride and to cope with the extreme weather conditions.  Well done to not only the Applied Tri athletes taking part, several completing an Ironman for the first time, but to all.

 

July also saw a first visit for many to Estonia.  I had the honour to be asked to team manage the Team GB AG Standard distance triathlon team at the European Championships in Tartu and what a fantastic event we had.  Despite some logistical issues, the event location and administration was top drawer.  The compact site allowed athletes to not only enjoy their own race, but to witness some excellent racing from the para athletes, juniors and the elites too.  Once again, Applied Tri athletes acquitted themselves very well, representing two of the many nations who were racing.

 

Top of the bill in July, however, was the World Duathlon Championships in Fyn, Denmark.  The Multisport festival over the course of a week was always going to be a real treat of racing with Applied Tri athletes competing in most of the events that took place.  It has been several years since I took part in a race at such a high level of competition, and I really miss the adrenaline that such close fought championships serve up.  Our best performance in Fyn, was a fabulous 5th place in the ladies 35 – 39 Sprint Duathlon by Helen Sahgal.  Despite having the now 9 time world champion Kirsten Sass in her category, Helen beat her on the opening run and matched her on the second run, only sadly losing out on the bike.  This great performance provides Helen with automatic qualification for the 2019 World Duathlon in Pontevedra, Spain and has inspired me to dust off my bike and get fit for the qualifier in Bedford in the autumn and return to the fray!

 

Thankfully, we are not going cold turkey after all these exciting performances and I am fortunate to be packing my bags in a couple of days to watch yet more Applied Tri athletes in action in Glasgow.  As soon as this event is complete, we will begin to turn our attention to Powerman Zofingen and assisting athletes in the final preparations for the autumn races.  We have much work still to do with marathons, the Brutal Tri and Brutal Du, autumn duathlon qualifiers, autumn duathlon weekend in the Peaks, Natural Running Form workshops, athlete testing and analysis, coach education and, just occasionally, some training of our own.

 

Please keep up the hard work and keep the great results coming!

 

01/06/18 Coaching News June

In the same way that May Week is now in June, our recent monthly newsletters are making their appearance in what could technically be described as a month late, even though effectively they have just tripped the calendar by a day.  And so, we therefore find ourselves in July with half the year now behind us and, for many athletes, crunch time is the weeks now ahead.  The events are coming thick and fast with the world duathlon championships, the European standard triathlon championships and Ironman Bolton all taking place in July.


Whilst this is therefore no time for some athletes to be making substantial changes in their exercise regimes, we have received several questions of late concerning nutrition and, in particular, from athletes seeking guidance on how to set themselves up for the day.  Therefore, Sarah has therefore given this some thought and presents her case for breakfast.

‘Breakfast cereal’ has become a modern paradox.  There is now so much evidence for the benefits of eating a substantial and low GI meal at the start of the day and yet food manufacturers continue to market refined carbohydrate as the ideal breakfast. (GI = glycaemic index; a ranking of foods based on their immediate effect on blood sugar levels).

The idea of eating grains for breakfast dates back to the late 19th century when food reformers called for a cut back on excessive meat consumption, and explored vegetarian alternatives.  Corn, oats and wheat were cheap to grow and methods were gradually found to make these grains palatable, with a certain amount of cooking involved.

With advances in food processing in the 20th century – hulling, rolling, puffing – breakfast cereals, which could now be eaten without cooking, became big business.  The more sophisticated processing increased the shelf life of the cereal, but also robbed the grains of their nutritional value.  The bran and germ were refined out – at the time, these were thought to interfere with digestion and nutrient absorption – but this process also removed important nutrients such as vitamin B and iron.  To improve the flavour, sugar was added.

Nowadays, breakfast cereals are likely to be fortified with minerals and vitamins in an attempt to boost their nutrient value, but many are still the result of over-refined grains, and so don’t provide much in the way of fibre and tend to be relatively high GI.

Eating breakfast early in the morning kick-starts your metabolism, the energy production process, and starts fuelling for your muscles and brain.  You should feel more alert following this first meal of the day and, by making it a substantial and low GI meal, you should feel more satiated for longer and avoid possible blood sugar and insulin spikes following your next meal.

Previous research has also shown that the thermic effect of food (calories burned due to digestion) is lower in the evening than in the morning, possibly due to slower emptying of the stomach.  A review of this and related research has led to the creation of the Big Breakfast Study, funded by the Medical Research Council.  Among other objectives, the study aims to assess the impact of meal times on the body’s energy expenditure processes.  The outcomes will contribute to improved nutritional guidelines, based on optimising the timing of calorie consumption.  The study will measure the effect of meal times on body weight, as well as blood pressure, blood glucose, insulin and cholesterol levels, and appetite.

I haven’t yet found out when this study is due to conclude but I’ll keep an eye on it and keep you posted.

In the meantime, I’d like to encourage you to do your own research.  The cereal manufacturers have conditioned us into thinking that the first meal of the day must be based on refined grains, but why is this when, at other times of the day, we are more inclined to eat balanced meals containing a protein source such as meat or fish, vegetables and complex carbs.  I want to challenge that thinking and ask you, would you eat casserole for breakfast?  Or rice?  Or salad?  Put your social conditioning to one side for a while and consider what a substantial and low GI breakfast could look like.  By front-loading your day (consuming most of your calories in the morning), you will also be less reliant on your evening meal for refuelling.   Especially for those of you doing the bulk of your training in the evenings, this is surely worth a try.

As with any aspect of your training regime, please make sure you introduce changes gradually; radically changing your eating habits can risk gastric discomfort.  But if you decide to give it a go, please let me know how you get on.

A final word on breakfast cereals – there is still a place for some of these in your food cupboard.  Those made without added sugar such as Weetabix or Branflakes, when served with milk, make a nutritious snack or small pre-exercise meal when time is tight.

For more information on the Big Breakfast Study read https://www.insight.mrc.ac.uk/2018/06/19/do-meal-timings-matter/

Food for thought, as ever.  It may also be speaking the obvious, however, please also give some thought to your hydration strategy at present.  This is important, not only for racing but also before, during and after your training sessions.  The more effective your hydration strategy, the more effective your training sessions will be and the sooner you will be able to recover and get out on your next session.

26/04/18 Coaching News April

As the numbers of coached and tested athletes at Applied Triathlon has increased, the range of experience of athlete has broadened.   Therefore, we increasingly find ourselves trying to ascertain the most effective way of both establishing the most appropriate training for this widening range of individuals as well as redefining our justifications and explanations for delivering that training.  Where running form is concerned, however, we keep going full circle.  No matter how much we explore the current academic literature and coach education guidance, we become more concerned by the inconsistencies we find.  Of course, we continue to make revisions to our coaching model as we discover more about this complex subject, and continuous learning certainly takes place.  However, the more we read and observe, the more confident we become that our approach to Natural Running Form is heading in the right direction.

 

Running is often considered to be simple activity – what Olympian Ron Clarke once described as putting one foot in front of the other and repeat.  It is generally understood that those with the best running genes who train the hardest are most likely to win.  However, running can almost certainly be described as a skill and this means that there must be a right or most effective way to do it.  Running is however a skill that is rarely effectively taught. 

 

All runners have stylistic differences - coach education confirms this - but it is the similarities which are important.   On closer inspection the best runners pretty much all do the same thing – foot contact, stance, toe off -  with less able runners completing the same process but less efficiency and less effectively.  Good runners are graceful; their running looks effortless and they (nearly) always look like good runners.  Ancient Greek paintings of runners display a similarity of running form whether depicting fast or slow running which is very similar to how Mo Farah runs.  There is an accepted link between consistency of training and performance but is there a link between consistency of form and consistency of training? 

 

Conversely, less efficient runners look like poor runners and their running form often differs according to their running pace.  Despite the development of modern running shoes, improvements in coach education (both in content and methodology) and increased scientific understanding, injury rates remain consistent across the endurance running community.  Some of these injuries can be associated with differing form and therefore, is there a link with inconsistent form and increased risk of injury?  

 

There are contradictory view points on what constitutes good running form, with opinion varying from “running style [being] ordained at birth” through to “stature and development” and thus currently there is no accepted (academic or coach) model of running that depicts good form.  This lack of a model has resulted in the force production concept of running remaining in vogue in coach education for the development of endurance athletes.  In simple terms, force is applied beneath and behind the runner to create propulsion.  This application of force comes at the price of greater ground reaction forces however, and therefore modern running shoes are provided with appropriate cushioning to reduce the effect this has on the runner.  This good intention of the added protection in the cushioned running shoe has however produced unintended consequences.  It has restricted sensory feedback, increased muscular atrophy of the key running muscles and enabled maladapted people to allow running with a heel striking action.  The increased impact transient as a result of heel striking is known to be a contributory factor in running injuries.  Combined with the modern lifestyle, the modern running shoe has allowed us to exceed our biomechanical capabilities in the search of running increased distances and intensities.

 

The recent barefoot running trend (better described as the re emergence of the minimalist running shoe) was borne out of identifying the need to reduce the risk of injury for endurance runners.  However, the trend is now pretty much gone, without establishing a legacy worthy of the initial noise it briefly made within the running community.  Efforts by authors of such work as Running Form (Danny Abshire), Chi Running (Danny Dreyer) and The Pose Method (Dr. Nicholas Romanov), with additional research by evolutionary biologist Professor Daniel Lieberman, established a plausible case but this was perhaps undermined by academic researchers not finding sufficient supporting evidence for the barefoot concept within the laboratory. 

 

It could be more strongly argued however that the failing of this movement was more in the inability of coaches and athletes to translate the drills and movements successfully into their everyday running without compromising their current level of performance.  Or indeed risking injury, which was counter-productive to the initial objective of runners changing running form, especially by those who forced the pace of transition.  Such impact as remains has probably been to encourage athletes and coaches to focus a little more on running form in training as opposed to outright performance, but it has been unclear which of the drills are appropriate for whom and how these drills are to be integrated into the actual process of running. 

 

Lieberman states that it is becoming increasingly more certain that western society is suffering from two modern afflictions:  a surfeit of highly calorific, readily available foodstuff and [leading] an increasingly sedentary lifestyle.  For long-term well being, this is proving to be a deadly combination.  Running remains the most easily accessible and potentially effective antidote to both.  However, the misunderstanding of appropriate drills leading to the misguided coaching of running is not only unlikely to effectively support those who currently run, but is also unlikely to encourage those who really need to participate in this most natural of activities.

 

Therefore, we shall continue to try to understand which drills work and why and to offer an easy to follow, safe and appropriate model of running for our athletes and non athletes to follow.  In time, with further understanding, there is no reason why running cannot be considered comparable to other skills.  Runners could be taught to effectively tune into the process and learn to consciously control running until the new form becomes a part of the subconscious. 

 

Here endeth the sermon for today!  In other news, Applied Triathlon is now a Triathlon England registered triathlon club and all coached athletes can consider themselves to be club members.  To take full advantage of this, please join Triathlon England as an individual member and annotate Applied Triathlon as your club. 

 

We have events a plenty on the horizon, lots more athlete testing and analysis to complete and our Monday swim slot at Woodgreen Leisure open air 50m pool to look forward to!  Please keep up the good training guys!

 

JC

26/03/18 Coaching News March

Well, what a month this has been.  Sadly, in most cases, we have not been able to put all the hard work in training into practice this month due to the weather which has resulted in multiple race postponements.  In duathlon in particular, we are used to the weather interfering with races, but I do not recall an occasion when so many events have been cancelled or postponed.  Not only does this cause problems for scheduling the re arranged events, we lose out on the opportunity of proving the effectiveness of the winter training.  All is not lost however, as you have all worked very hard to ensure that you have maintained your training wherever possible.  Training indoors may not always be as effective as getting outside but I am confident that many of your fellow competitors have simply been striking through their training with another missed session and so I am very pleased that you have all continued to stick with it despite the conditions.

That said, we have seen some strong racing performances this month both before the weather deteriorated and yesterday at the National Duathlon Championships.  Progress has been made across the board and, the training data has supported the potential for improved performance where athletes haven’t been able to race. Therefore, we must push on and realign the training for the next set of objectives and rely on the training data assuming that this would have translated into improved performances in every case.

What then still awaits us this year?  Next up are the early season marathons with athletes running at both London and Manchester – good luck guys!  Then the focus switches to the European Middle Distance Duathlon championships followed a few weeks later by the World Standard and Sprint Distance races, both events being held in Denmark.  During this period, I will continue to run bike lactate testing from the clinic at Weedon and will be leading bike recces over the UK Ironman course at Bolton for those who are targeting this as their main event this year.  For those aiming to race in the triathlons at Tartu and Glasgow in July and August (or Bolton) or trying to qualify for next year’s triathlons, I have now confirmed the booking at the 50m heated, open air pool in Banbury on Monday evenings.  This session is available to all levels of swimmers with an emphasis on stroke improvement initially, followed by conditioning later in the season.  There may be the opportunity for video analysis, but this is still being negotiated at present.  For those awaiting a swim video analysis session at Tiddenfoot, this has been penciled in for Saturday 14th April.  Any takers for either sessions should contact me soonest, please.

For the Long Distance Duathlon team, the first round of qualification has now been completed - congratulations to all.  Please note that the next cut off for discounted race entry is in a few days’ time.  Please don’t miss out!  I will soon be trying to get confirmation of the second run course from the race organiser for this year so that we can prepare the appropriate training.  The last-minute changes last year certainly affected performances across the board!  More news on this will therefore follow.

A much less controversial newsletter this month and I will have to postpone the answer to the question received a couple of weeks ago as to why we test for lactate threshold and turn points rather than VO2.  There is a short answer to this question, however, I would rather explain it in more length in my response.  What spare time we currently have has been taken up with both coaching and reviewing my work on Natural Running Form.  We continue to operate a programme of continuous improvement on all the work we undertake and I have recently returned to the topic of running form to both improve the quality of our analysis as well as improve the clarity of the reporting.  The ultimate objective is to not only report on what we discover on each individual athlete within our analysis, but also to produce a visual model of what we perceive good running form to be.  This is no small task and is certainly proving to be one of the most challenging and yet exciting tasks we have undertaken.  It will certainly save me from having to do some of my own training for a while and so I will have to continue to train vicariously through all your efforts! 

Please keep up the hard work.

Cheers

JC

01/03/18 Coaching News February

 

Coaching News February

 

I had intended to write about other matters this month, however, I received a lot of feedback including some questions on last month’s musings (https://naturalrunningform.wordpress.com/2018/02/01/coaching-news-january/), and therefore I have decided to respond to this first.

 

I am reliably informed that the rats chosen for the experiments were young and male and the main question raised last month was whether the outcome would be the same had the rats been female.  Sadly, I simply do not know.  As yet, I haven’t had the wherewithal to track down any specific research (of which there is an awful lot with whole journals assigned to the subject) and in truth, I am not a fan of laboratory-based research on mammals.  Rodents they may well be, but rodents form over half of the world’s mammal types, and over 100 million mammals are used in laboratory testing every year.  This fact always leaves me feeling just slightly queasy.

 

My guess is that the result would be different with female rats.  Exactly what form this difference would take, I do not know, but I do know that this answer exposes me to the risk of being accused of applying stereotypical beliefs to these complex biological and social interactions.  In today’s politically correct climate, it is becoming increasingly difficult to discuss differences between the sexes.  

 

More here:  https://naturalrunningform.wordpress.com/2018/02/28/coaching-news-february/

 

 

01/02/18 Coaching News January

Coaching News – January 2018

 

My Facebook feed has been momentarily lit up by a podcast of an interview with a retired coach of elite athletes in the still small community of triathlon.  The principal topic, according to the title, is developing running speed but, as yet, I haven’t found the time to listen to what this coach has to say.  It’s not that I don't think that I can learn from his experience – although I note that despite his success, athletes in his charge have succumbed to more than their fair share of injuries – but I am disappointed that he waited until retirement before allowing others to share in his coaching methodology.

 

More to be found here:https://naturalrunningform.wordpress.com/2018/02/01/coaching-news-january/

 

 

31/12/17 Coaching News December

Coaching News December - another yaer comes to a close and an exciting new one full of opportunity begins... https://wordpress.com/post/naturalrunningform.wordpress.com/759

 

 

16/12/17 Another Cat win for Deb Self

An end of season bonus with another victory at the Putney Riverside 10k for Applied Tri runner Deb Self.

 

06/12/17 2018 Training Camp Update

We have confirmed the availability of our preferred chateaux at St Michel de Vax and can therefore provide a reduced price for early bird bookings for triathletes and duathletes seeking the edge in performance for next year.  Based on either 4 males or 4 females securing a booking with a £300 deposit each, £995 per person provides 6 nights accommodation (double room each), 7 x self service breakfast all food supplied with fixings for packed lunch, 5 x evening meals with wine (the schedule allows for a self-funded meal out), airport transfers, transport to venues and pools, fully coached training sessions including swim video analysis, bike lactate testing and running form analysis.  Not included = flights, 1 supper at restaurant 9transport provided), personal insurance, money for coffee stops and lunches.  Dates flexible, please contact us for more details.

14/11/17 Toni Sheen at Ride London

One of this year's success stories, Toni Sheen takes on Ride London...

23/10/17 New office location for Applied Triathlon Coaching

New office location confirmed at The Royal Ordnance Depot, Weedon Bec. Opening Monday 30th October 2017.

17/09/17 Vikki claims bronze at world sprint tri!

Congratulations to Applied Tri coached athlete Vikki Voysey for a thoroughly well deserved Bronze medal at the World Sprint Tri Champs, Rotterdam - chapeau! 

10/09/17 New dates for 2017-18 Training Camps including ladies only

A new 'ladies only' triathlon training camp opportunity is available at our location in the Midi-Pyrenees from 22-29 October. All inclusive from touchdown to take off (including vegan option) with swim video analysis, bike lactate testing and run video analysis. Just pitch up and play to make the most of this outstanding training area. Designed for mixed ability. More details http://www.appliedtri.co.uk/training-camps/ or please drop me a PM. NB. Two dates including 4 day and 7 days training camps are currently being scheduled for 30 March - 13th April. Please register your interest with us.

03/09/17 Emma Pooley wins the World Long Distance Duathlon Championships for the 4th time!

Delighted to have been a witness to yet another world title for Emma Pooley - what an outstanding athlete!

03/09/17 Flora Colledge mixes it with the elite ladies

Great racing from all Team GB athletes at PM Zofingen today including a second victory from Flora Colledge

02/09/17 Team GB AG Long Distance Duathlon team 2017

Team GB AG LD Duathlon team reading to roll at the World Long Distance Duathlon Championships, Powerman Zofingen 2017

29/08/17 Powerman Zofingen ITU World LD Duathlon Championships 

Heading back to Switzerland as Team GB LD Duathlon Team Manager for the greatest show on earth...hope to be racing there again myself next year...

16/08/17 2018 Tartu ETU Standard Distance qualifiers

2018 ETU Standard Triathlon second round of qualifiers at Grafham Water now complete.  Next stop Bala in September!

15/08/17 Ian Hanson 20:20 for Stoke Mandeville

Applied Triathlon Coaching athlete Ian Hanson started his 20:20 challenge today - that's 20 Standard Distance triathlons (1,500m swim, 40km bike, 10km run) in 20 days to celebrate 20 years since his successful remission from cancer and to raise funds for Stoke mandeville Hospital.  you can donate to this excellent cause here: https://make-a-donation.org/fundraisers/ian-hanson

 

13/08/17 UK Anti-Doping campaign - accredited advisor

Applied Triathlon Coaching support 100% me and have qualified as an Accredited Advisor to UK Anti Doping.

06/08/17 Vikki Voysey wins ETU qualifiers at Grafham Water

A fantastic first lady for Applied Triathlon Coaching triathlete Vikki Voysey at the Anglian Triathlon ETU qualifier.  An incredible return to form for Vikki!

 

2018 Tartu ETU Standard Distance Triathlon qualifiers

The first round of qualifiers from the Castle Howard Tri for the 2018 Tartu ETU Standard Distance triathlon team has now been completed.  Next stop - the Anglian Water tri on 6th August for Round 2!

04/06/17 Ultra Festival 2017

Leading efficient hill running workshop at the Ultra Festival 2017

04/06/17 Vikki Voysey wins National Sprint Tri for the 2nd year running

Vikki leading her category out of the water...

...and getting back to her old running form...and performance...

21/05/17 Vikki Voysey leading out the pack on the world qualifier

Despite some early sesaon setbacks with her running, Vikki's super smooth swim and super strong bike was enough to claim 3rd place at Eton Dorney Sprint triathlon resulting in qualification for the World Sprint Triathlon Champs in Rotterdam in September.  Next up... the european Champs in kitzbuhel in June.

07/03/17 Joining forces with Britta Sorensen for Training Camps

We are delighted to be joining forces with Britta Sorensen MPhil for our 2017 Triathlon training camps in Midi-Pyrenees.  I met Britta at Loughborough University and we quickly developed a good working relationship and identfied our shared love of triathlon and all things endurance.  Britta is currently mapping out bike routes and testing the swim facilities in france and sneaking in some extra training before our arrival next week!

28/02/17 February Coaching Newsletter

A belated link to the February edition of Coaching News

16/02/17 Triathlon Training Camp Itineray Confirmed

Possibly the most comprehensive triathlon training camp is now available to you in March.  Have your swimming analysed through video technology, complete a lactate test on the bike to establish appropriate training zones and learn the benefits of Natural Running Form to help set you p for your best season yet.  Please contact us soonest for details. 

29/01/17 Coaching News January 2017

Get the latest Coaching News from the Natuarl Running Form blog here: https://naturalrunningform.wordpress.com

16/01/2017 Natural running form workshop with Jo Parker MBE

Despite the challenging conditions, it was great to see Jo again and to assess how much her running has improved since she attended an LBTri Natural Running Form Group workshop.  in between reading her book, the rather excellent Water Under the Bridge, I am now working on her analysis report and revised feedback with exercises and drills.

06/01/2017 Vikki Voysey training hard

Vikki Voysey spent two half days with us specifically to work on her cycling and to assess her progress developing her running form.  After a 20km test ride over the Big-Cow cycle route, she then rode 5 repetitions of Chicheley Hill working on varying cadences to help optimise her hill climbing cadence.  Despite very difficult conditions - cold, wind and rain - we have some excellent early season data to progress her training for this season.  Some quick video analysis confirmed that her running form has indeed improved and this was qualified further after a visit to Hannah Watkinson at Frontline Podiatry. Vikki closed a tough few hours of training with two climbs of Bison Hill.

01/01/2017 - Training camps announced

We have just announced our inaugural training camp to be held in March 2017 in France.

 

Find out more about training camps.

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Applied Triathlon Coaching incorporates British Duathlon, Natural Running Form and Applied Sports Therapy.